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BOY IN THE STRIPED PAJAMAS PDF

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The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas. By John Boyne. Published: David Fickling Books . ISBN: This Large Print Book has been. JOHN BOYNE 1 THE BOY IN THE STRIPED PYJAMAS JOHN BOYNE 2 THE BOY IN THE STRIPED PYJAMAS JOHN BOYNE 3 THE BOY IN THE STRIPED. JOHN BOYNE 1 THE BOY IN THE STRIPED PYJAMAS JOHN BOYNE 2 THE BOY IN THE STRIPED PYJAMAS JOHN BOYNE 3 THE BOY I.


Boy In The Striped Pajamas Pdf

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Synopsis: The story of The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas is very difficult to describe. Usually we give some clues about the book on the cover, but in this case we. it's written in the innocence of a 9-year-old boy makes it easy to In our case it is the reading of the book, The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas. . Retrieved from http:// sppn.info Meeting the boy in the striped pyjamas - Literature in ELT | Dario Luis Banegas. The Boy in the Striped Pajamas Lesson Plans. The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.

I generally have turned to listening to audiobooks and I hate it when they put music to it. I am not going to bothe Thank you so much for your review. I am not going to bother with this book. Out With is strange. Aus-Wisch is the translation used in the German edition. I have a hard time thinking a well-read 9 year old would make that kind of mistake. This book is so ignorant of historical facts about concentration camps that it kicks the history of the Holocaust right in the teeth.

John Boyne's premise is that the nine-year old son of the commandant of Auschwitz, bored with his isolated life, takes walks to the fence s "The Boy in the Striped Pajamas" would easily top my list of "Worst Books about the Holocaust. John Boyne's premise is that the nine-year old son of the commandant of Auschwitz, bored with his isolated life, takes walks to the fence surrounding this infamous camp and meets there a nine-year old inmate who is on the other side of the fence.

The two boys become friends and continue meeting on a daily basis. Here is some news for Mr. The ft high barbed wire fence surrounding each camp was electrified. Touch if once and you are fried. There was a no-man's land on each side of the fence; along the inside perimeter of the fence were guard towers; each tower was manned by an armed guard around the clock; each guard was responsible for one segment of the fence within his vision; it was his duty to prevent anyone from approaching the fence, either from the inside, or from the outside; he was under orders to shoot anyone he saw approaching the no-man's-land.

Let me add this. A nine-year-old boy arriving in Auschwitz-Birkenau on a cattle train would take only a single walk in this camp: from the train to the gas chamber. It is a fantasy that does untold damage to the cause of truth about the Holocaust. This book has only one purpose: to make a lot of money for the author and the publisher. And this purpose it accomplishes. The publisher recently proudly trumpeted in an ad in the New York Times: over one-million copies sold and still going strong.

And that's not even counting the profits from the revolting movie based on this book. These camps were about brutality, starvation, and sheer terror. ISBN 0 00 9 There are so many historical inaccuracies and ludicrous details in this totally implausible story of Boyne's eg.

Bruno's ignorance of basics, impossible when he would have been in the Hitler Youth and the Nazi education system. This travesty of the Holocaust is called a 'fable' as if with all its faults, it has special claim on some gravitas, thus giving Boyne justification for this lame expose of racism.

I was a member of the Jewish Holocaust Committee here in Sydney for a while and once had to endure a young rabbi lecturing on how the Holocaust was God's punishment on the Jews. So there are fools to be found inside the club as well as outside it. Not a single pure ethnic German child entered a gas chamber as part of the extermination of the Jews When protests brought this program to a close the same staff were later sent to operate the gas chambers in the camps. And for six million Jewish men, women and children there was no saviour.

This bitter pill is too much for some people to swallow. Some, like the young rabbi, takes refuge in blaming the very victims; others find refuge in sentimental fiction such as Boyne's which does no honour to these tragic, lost people. And today there are perverse forces abroad, from renowned historians to Catholic bishops, who would deny that the Holocaust ever took place or to an extraordinary lesser degree. They use every discrepancy of detail as well as lies to justify their denial.

There is an overwhelming library of rivetting, emotional, inspiring and tragic Holocaust stories out there - all factual, which you may have already plunged into. Boyne may even have led you there. But finally Boyne just deserves to fade away. The Oscar winning Foreign Language film of , "Life is Beautiful", was also, not surprisingly, referred to as a 'fable'.

It also is an implausible piece of Holocaust sentimentality and a stampede away from having to swallow the bitter pill of reality. View all 38 comments. A powerful concept, but very poorly written even allowing for the young adult target audience - and one of a tiny number of books I can think of that was better in the film version. Plot Bruno is 9 and lives in Berlin in with his parents and 12 year old sister.

They are wealthy and his father is an important soldier who is promoted to be the Commandant at Auschwitz. The trick of the story is that Bruno doesn't realise the horror of what goes on behind the barbed wire, where everyone wears s A powerful concept, but very poorly written even allowing for the young adult target audience - and one of a tiny number of books I can think of that was better in the film version. The trick of the story is that Bruno doesn't realise the horror of what goes on behind the barbed wire, where everyone wears striped pyjamas, even when he befriends a boy of the same age at a corner of the camp.

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Although his father can be strict and distant, Bruno is unfailing in his trust in the goodness of his father. In the film, there was at least a gradual, if reluctant, dawning of doubt about his father and all he stood for, but that doesn't happen in the book; the themes of family, friendship and trust are barely touched on.

Implausible Ignorance The main problem is that it's told from Bruno's viewpoint, and he is ridiculously naive and ignorant for the son of a senior Nazi. Not knowing, and not wanting to know, the horror of what was happening is entirely understandable especially when a parent is involved. However, he hasn't heard of "the Fatherland", thinks the Fuhrer is called The Fury throughout , that Auschwitz is called "Out With" and that "Heil Hitler" means "goodbye"! Yet we're meant to believe that he's the 9 year old son of a senior Nazi!

His father had clearly been neglecting his duty to train the next generation of Hitler youth. And anyway, the puns wouldn't work in German. What is even more insulting to readers is that Boyne has responded to this widespread point of criticism by saying that anyone who thinks the boy is too naive is denying the holocaust! See Kelly H. Maybedog comment on Oct 02, and subsequent ones.

And it's leaking", and a nasty person who "always looked as if he wanted to cut someone out of his will". It might have worked better if Bruno had been 5 or 6, but I suppose the target audience would have been less willing to read it, so the result is a book that isn't really suitable for any age group.

What a waste. Postscript 1 Arising from Kelly Hawkins' review: Boyne says: People say: When he goes to the fence, and when he asks that question, he is kind of representing the rest of us who are trying to understand the Holocaust and find some answers to it. Also, when the camps were liberated, the world was surprised through and The majority of the Holocaust had taken place over four years and, granted, it was a different information age but I still maintain that in those sorts of movies, the naivety is appropriate.

Elsewhere, he is quoted as saying that naivety and complacency were two of the main reasons the Holocaust occurred http: I find that a very unsatisfying defence. It answers why people don't want to know the horrors which I fully acknowledge , but does not begin to tackle Bruno's specific ignorance of common words related to the Third Reich.

Postscript 2, October His new book has a similar title and another Nazi theme - with Hitler himself this time: The Boy at the Top of the Mountain. I won't be reading that, but I suspect it will cause similar controversy. Postscript 3 See this excellent review by a survivor of Nazi concentration camps.

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Boyne posting as John responded to some of the criticisms: Postscript 4, 14 May In today's Sunday Times, the Prime Minister Theresa May was asked by a year old in her constituency, "Has your thinking ever changed because of a novel?

It is a very, very cleverly written book and a very well-written book, and what it brings home is the absolute horror of the Holocaust. Dec 01, Arlene rated it it was amazing Shelves: The Boy in the Striped Pajamas is truly an amazing yet daunting novel that I will never forget.

The author John Boyne did a masterful job of depicting the setting in such vivid detail and exposing the events in a manner that I felt a constant emotional pull as the story unfolded and impending doom lingered on the horizon. I feel the author did a grand job of juxtaposing two resounding themes in such a flawless manner; one being of the evil that was the Holocaust; against the second theme that of the innocence of a child.

I thought it was brilliant of Boyne to tell the story from the perspective of a nine year old German boy as you experience the events of this abominable and unthinkable time in history as a mere complicit bystander, which ultimately leaves you with a sense of hopelessness.

The story unfolds the day Bruno arrives home to discover his family is moving from Berlin to Auschwitz where his father will serve as a Commandant for the concentration camp. Bruno is forced to leave his three best friends for life and discovers that life in Auschwitz is lonely and desolate.

All that changes the day he meets a boy his exact age and they begin to forge a friendship over the course of year. However, as much as he finds he and Schmuel have in common, living on opposite sides of the fence proves to have a devastating consequence to their friendship. After completing this book, I did some research on the author and the novel and found that he not only received well deserved praise for this book, but also harsh criticism.

As with any piece of literature, when words are committed to page and presented to an audience for their interpretation there will be varying degrees of acceptance and backlash. Well, my hats off to John Boyne for tackling a story through a unique perspective and presenting a poignant fable that as a reader I willingly suspended my reality and experienced the events in a way that exposed my emotions and feelings to such a raw level.

Well done IMHO. View all 68 comments. Nov 14, Lola rated it really liked it Shelves: When I was very young, I lived in Romania. Because there was past drama in my family, I had three grandmothers and two grandfathers. I was close to two of my grandmothers and one of my grandfathers, because they lived near my mother, brother, stepfather and I. The other couple, I only saw during summers.

They lived in the country, where there was no indoor bathroom, no internet, no chocolate and no sense of community that I felt at the age of six. Every morning, I would wake up from the best of dreams: But she never did, because she was far away and we had to stay for three whole months with our grandparents.

I felt lonely. I had no one to play with. One day, I met a little girl. I was so happy that I immediately invited her to our house.

We played for a while, and it was wonderful. I had a friend. When my grandfather woke up from his nap and saw me playing with this girl, he was so angry I thought he would hurt her.

He shooed her away forcefully. I was six, what did I care that she had a darker skin colour, spoke another language entirely and prayed to different gods? It made me so mad, I became a lion.

I roared at him, and roared until I had no more voice. Then I cried, because there was nothing else I could have done as a very young child. She was too scared of my grandfather to talk to me again. There was a huge wall between our houses and I could see nothing of what was happening on their side, so I never saw her again either. I understand the loneliness Bruno felt all too well. View all 18 comments.

Lincoln's doctor's dog. An archaic reference in the publishing industry to the notion that the way to ensure a book is a bestseller is to write about Lincoln, dogs, or doctors. So the sure-fire formula for creating a bestseller is to write a story Lincoln's doctor's dog.

When I review a book, I look at both the medium and the content. Sometimes, you will find a great story which is badly written: Sometimes you have both, and the book becomes really enjoyable. And when the medium and the content are so aptly intertwined to be inseparable, you have a truly great book.

Very rarely, you have the misfortune to encounter a really abominable story which is abysmally written into the bargain — this happened to me with this book.

The only good thing I can say about it is that it is a very fast read. Now for the analysis. The Background This book is historical fiction yes, yes, I know that the author has claimed it is a fable situated in the time of the Holocaust: Auschwitz, according to my knowledge, had no children — they were sent to gas chambers the moment they arrived.

Yet here we have a camp which is literally crawling with kids, almost like a kindergarten. We also have a German child Bruno, who despite being the son of a high-ranking Nazi officer who is very close to Hitler, does not know about Aryans, Jews and the concentration camps. Agreed, he may not be aware of the atrocities going on in those places: In the book, Bruno remains blissfully ignorant about all until the end. He almost seems mentally challenged. My knowledge about Auschwitz comes from reading history books only, but as far as I know, the camps were guarded by electrified fences and patrolled heavily across the clock.

It would not have been easy for somebody just to lift up the barbed wire and crawl in. And how was Schmuel the Jewish boy able to constantly evade the guards and come to the same spot at the fence where it was loose at the bottom? Characterisation Bruno is easily one of the most annoying protagonists ever created. The boy simply refuses to see what happens in front of his eyes. Even if he has not been indoctrinated impossible, as mentioned earlier, in Nazi Germany , he would have picked up much more.

Children do.

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas

Most of the other characters are pasteboard, including Schmuel, the Jewish kid, put there as props to support the plot and move it along. They are all one-dimensional other than the servant Maria and the Jewish doctor-turned-waiter Pavel. But they serve only to fill the space around Bruno.

The Writing I could have forgiven Mr. Boyne for all these historical blunders and failures in characterisation, had he written good prose. But that is the most terrible part of the book — the prose is puerile. First, the repetition.

We are told that his sister Gretel is a Hopeless Case every time she is mentioned. As a teen, I used to watch Hollywood war movies in which all Germans spoke English.

The narrative was problematic. From the loose fence under which one can crawl through, the story jumps from hole to hole till it drops into the biggest hole of them all, the tragic finale. By that time, Boyne is pushing all the emotional buttons, trying to bring the tears on at full throttle… but the real tragedy here is the death of literature.

I understand that this book is a bestseller, and I can understand the reasons. I regret to say that this seems to me like adroit marketing of human tragedy… successful in this case. View all 58 comments. Sep 03, Lisa rated it did not like it Shelves: There are plenty of insightful reviews on this piece of sensationalist, badly written, idiotic Disneyfication of the Holocaust on Goodreads.

I don't have anything to add to the criticism, except that I would love to see it taken off the curriculum in schools. Here are my replacement suggestions: Upon the Head of the Goat: Stories of a Boy Growing Up in Warsaw And of course for more mature students, I recommend Anne Fran There are plenty of insightful reviews on this piece of sensationalist, badly written, idiotic Disneyfication of the Holocaust on Goodreads. The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas is a shameless money-making machine without writing skill or depth, without nuance or finesse, without basic knowledge of history or children's levels of understanding at age 9, and without the slightest ethical guidelines.

The target group is unfortunately a generation of parents, teachers and children who have lost touch with complex historical and linguistic knowledge and who need a babyish, fictionalised, shockingly inaccurate version of the Second World War to stay focused - and that is unacceptable in my opinion.

Instead of giving in to the lower level of comprehension, we need to put in the extra effort to be able to read on the same level as generations of children before!

We can't afford to lose the literacy fight, as it means losing the fight for historical knowledge and distinctions! View all 42 comments. Mar 12, Phrynne rated it really liked it Shelves: I have actually sat for five full minutes gazing at a blank page and wondering what to say about this book.

Words don't usually fail me! It does of course deal with a very painful and shocking part of our history and there are criticisms about some alterations to the true facts.

The Boy In the Striped Pajamas (Movie Tie-in Edition) Teacher’s Guide

However The Boy in the Striped Pajamas is obviously intended for the younger end of the young adult range and the presentation needs to be fairly simplistic. Boyne himself describes it as a fable, that is a fiction story I have actually sat for five full minutes gazing at a blank page and wondering what to say about this book.

Boyne himself describes it as a fable, that is a fiction story with a moral, and I think that is a good description. I was several pages in before it suddenly dawned on me that the Fury was the Fuhrer but I was a bit quicker to identify Out With. That ending is so very, very sad.

And then the final paragraph which reads like something from a fairy tale when it was so totally the opposite: Of course all this happened a long time ago and nothing like that could ever happen again.

Not in this day and age. View all 26 comments. Nov 08, Betsy rated it did not like it. I'll give it this much. I think I need to go boil my eyeballs for a while. What was the author thinking? View all 29 comments. Bruno, at nine, is one year shy of mandatory membership in the Hitler-Jugend, and his sister Gretel, at 12, would have been in the BDM for the previous TWO years and moreover the children of a high-ranking SS officer would absolutely have known who Hitler was and not mixed up his name.

So that gave me pause from about page 5 on. All of my criticisms make me think that Boyne did absolutely no research on German history, the German language, Nazis, the Holocaust or Auschwitz, and I'm beyond irritated to find out that this book is being touted as "the new Diary of Anne Frank " and indeed, replacing that work for kids in some schools.

This book trivializes the Holocaust and the murder of millions by turning these things into a feeble allegory about the universality of ethnic hatred and positing that all we really need are two boys who can crawl under the fences to each other.

View all 8 comments. Oct 24, Julia Miller rated it it was amazing. I am bawling my eyes out. John Boyne, thank you for writing this. I wish I could undo all the horrible things that happened to innocent people including all people who were affected by t I am bawling my eyes out.

I wish I could undo all the horrible things that happened to innocent people including all people who were affected by the Holocaust, not only the Jews. View all 3 comments. There is nothing to learn from this book.

There is much to dislike. From certain perspectives, it can even be said to be detestable. First of all, there is the authorial conceit that the work is written from the perspective of a child. The worst example of this come in the use of euphemisms for the Fuhrer 'the Fury' and for Auschwitz 'Out With' which become increasingly irritating as the work progresses.

Bruno's 'difficulty' with these words is somehow supposed to charm us, and apparently giv There is nothing to learn from this book. Bruno's 'difficulty' with these words is somehow supposed to charm us, and apparently gives the reader 'in the know' a soft, patronising glow which is presumably there to create a certain kind of sympathy for Bruno. It is interesting to note that Bruno apparently had no difficulty with the Boy in the Striped Pyjamas's name of Schmuel maybe he could have referred to him as the 'mule'?

The same tweeness is in the description of the prison garb as 'striped pyjamas', although that is less irritating. It is really pushing the envelope to assume that Bruno is as naive as depicted.

Indeed, it is this apparent ignorance of even the most basic things about Hitler's Germany, and it's attitude to Jews, that would have been brainwashed into the minds of German Youth, that is hardest to come to grips with. The author's 'childlike' writing permits him to draw several obscuring veils over the whole question. Even at the end, as Bruno and Schmuel go hand in hand into the 'darkness' and 'disappear' there is really nothing to indicate what happened to them.

A child reading this, without any awareness of the horrors of Auschwitz, could be forgiven for believing simply that they 'disappeared' into some mysterious unknown. Thus despite its cutesy language, the book is obviously intended to be read by adults who presumably DO know what happened to them; and that fact alone makes the writing condescending and patronising to say the least.

Since the reader is presumed to know these things, they will also know that the situation described in the book could never have happened. And, by the way, isn't it lucky that Schmuel speaks German? Had he been from some other country and spoken a different language, who knows how the story might have gone? These are just some of the many irritations to be found in the book. The author has tried to justify it by arguing that the story is a fable, and that these things don't matter. But if it is a fable, then fables usually teach a moral of some kind.

What is the moral in this story? Don't trust in the friendship of Jews? Innocence and ignorance is no protection for awful things to happen to you? The fact that people feel saddened by the ending, or even shocked by it, is even more repellent: Because of the 'hiding' of the reality of the Auschwitz atrocities, the whole situation regarding Schmuel and the other victims seems to disappear, just as Schmuel and Bruno do. Sad, isn't it? I cannot help but feel deep repulsion towards this 'fable'.

That such a deeply offensive approach is somehow apparently easily disregarded because of a twee authorial trick of using sweet, sugary language, and helps make it such a popular, 'safe' book no nasties crawling about here!

The Boy in The Striped Pyjamas (PDF)

The book is inane, badly written, historically inaccurate, lacking in any sense of moral teaching no one in the book 'learns' anything, or even changes their attitude to anything and is hardly inspiring. It is banal. View all 14 comments. Since I am the last of the 4. At times I felt Bruno was a bit of a spoiled turd. I then felt guilty for feeling that way. I appreciated the way the relationship between his parents was portrayed. This would be a great discussion point for a book club. That ending!

And those last sentences? Scary and timely! Perhaps because I was expecting it to be sad. I had been warned on multiple occasions to read with a box of tissue at my side. View all 4 comments. Jan 28, Felicia rated it really liked it. I figured since I'm trying to read every Boyne book I should reread this one. Thanks a lot, Self.

View all 30 comments. Mar 11, Shannon leaninglights rated it really liked it. This story. I'm glad I finally read it.

It's taken me years to pick it up and watching the movie last month gave me the nudge to finally read it. Actually seeing it was worse in the movie in terms of heartbreak and devastation. Such a powerful read, but not for the faint of heart. View 1 comment. Aug 30, Hadrian rated it did not like it Shelves: Another case of some unscrupulous bastard making money with overwrought dramatizations of real tragedies.

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View all 13 comments. This was a really good read. I couldn't help getting images of the movie adaptation that I have watched a long time ago. I loved everything about this book. I thought this book would make me cry buckets and buckets but I didn't. Actually it clutched my whole being.

And I just had to keep on reading it till the last page as I couldn't stop reading it. Yes, it is this interesting. The characters were so alive and unique on their own. Bruno and Shmuel. Your innocence and friendship will be etched fore This was a really good read.

Your innocence and friendship will be etched forever in my soul. One of my most favourite classics so far. The irony it turned out to be. Such innocent kids. I watched the movie years ago. It was good too Apr 10, There was one particular part where one of them feels betrayed by the other. It made me cry. And the consequences of that made me cry so har Amy, yes. And the consequences of that made me cry so hard Sep 26, jv poore rated it really liked it Shelves: I added this to my To-Read list when a couple of students requested it, then Boy began to read it.

Whenever he put it down, I picked it up because Buno is the perfect narrator to pull any reader right in.

It's impossible not to adore him in his blissful ignorance. Part of me wished he could live in his bubble forever, while another part wanted to explain exactly what was going down. No part of me properly anticipated how the story would end. Most of the time they came across something interesting that was just sitting there, minding its own business, waiting to be discovered such as America. Other times they discovered something that was probably best left alone like a dead mouse at the back of a cupboard.

Mostly, he just wants to know why he has to put up with rules and be lonely and uncomfortable. Bruno is a nine-year old boy living a privileged life in a big house in Berlin with his parents and his annoying twelve-year-old sister, Gretel.

When the story opens, he walks into his bedroom and discovers the maid packing up all his things. But it seemed a little unfair that they all had to go with her. Even if Father moves, why do the rest of them have to go live far away?

There was the fact that he never smiled and always looked as if he was trying to find somebody to cut out of his will. I think this is Bruno, using what he knows of life from an adventure story of someone off to seek their fortune maybe because they've been cut out of a will.

He lives in his head. He begins exploring to learn more about where he is and to try to find a friend. This began so quietly and simply, that I wondered if it would hold my interest. It did. Even quite young readers will be able to read it, although they may miss the subtleties which appear as tiny observations throughout. And they will need some explanation of the names and words that Bruno misunderstands. But they will eventually learn their significance.

Read the whole thing. I haven't seen the film, but I think the book says it all. Sometimes simple says it best. I'm not sure. I finished this book yesterday and I am still having trouble forming an opinion--but here it goes.

I have thought about it a lot which is generally a sign of good writing, but in this case, maybe I am thinking about it because the book disturbed me. If I look at the Holocaust historical fiction genre as a whole, I am not sure what this book adds to the group.

It does show another point of view, from the child of the Commandant of Auschwitz, but Bruno is so terrifically dense--naive well beyond hi I finished this book yesterday and I am still having trouble forming an opinion--but here it goes. It does show another point of view, from the child of the Commandant of Auschwitz, but Bruno is so terrifically dense--naive well beyond his nine years--that I am not sure what the point is.

Bruno talks to his Jewish friend on the other side of the fence for over a year--he lives in his house which also serves as the headquarters of Auschwitz for over a year--and I am supposed to believe that he doesn't have any clue what is going on in the camp?

I know children are narcissistic and self involved, but this book takes that idea to a whole other level. Bruno's tunnel vision is so great that I keep wondering if maybe that it was some sort of message that the author was trying to get across.

Maybe that kids can create and live in an alternate reality as long as they need to? Was that the point? If not, what was the point? Surely it wasn't the shocking ending that served little in adding to the greater story of the Holocaust. The ending served no purpose. It didn't make the father see what was wrong, it didn't make the guards question what they were doing, it didn't make the Jews who died in the camp any less tragic, what was the ending's purpose?

My guess is just shock value. I do think the book makes an excellent argument for being honest with children in even the worst circumstances. By trying to protect kids and shield kids, adults put them in greater danger! I will say one positive thing, I thought the non-traditional book jacket was a good marketing ploy. By not giving away any of the plot points, it makes the reader intrigued.

But, overall, I am flummoxed. The book is an enigma which, possibly, is better left unsolved. View all 6 comments. Jul 06, James rated it it was amazing. Before the film, the stage play and now the ballet…came the original novel.

This is a compellingly original and extremely well-conceived and written book. An excellent and important book that should be read by all. View all 5 comments. When his father is promoted to Commandant in the German army and his family is transferred from their comfy home in Berlin to a strange place called Out-With, nine year-old Bruno has no idea of the true nature of his new surroundings. Indeed, he is also unaware of the horrors being perpetrated at the command of the German leader, the Fury, who visits the family one evening.

He is unimpressed by the small man with his tiny ineffectual moustache. The dreaded concentration camp as seen through Bruno When his father is promoted to Commandant in the German army and his family is transferred from their comfy home in Berlin to a strange place called Out-With, nine year-old Bruno has no idea of the true nature of his new surroundings. John Boyne cleverly approaches the spectre of Auschwitz and the internment of the Jews from a totally new perspective.

A solid thought-provoking novel from one of the best Irish writers. View all 12 comments. Originally reviewed on March 28, After the umpteenth time of being confronted with the controversy over this book primarily through one review and associated comments I let myself provoked into reading it.

I checked out the audio CDs only four and the book as well from the local library. My verdict: It's good, except maybe for the end. I liked it. It's a novel. It doesn't have to be realistic.The titular boy in the striped pajamas is a literary device, a condui Originally reviewed on March 28, After the umpteenth time of being confronted with the controversy over this book primarily through one review and associated comments I let myself provoked into reading it.

View 1 comment. Nov 14, Lola rated it really liked it Shelves: As an audio recording, I'm pretty neutral. Before they leave, Bruno disguises himself and sneaks into the camp to help his friend find his missing father. View all 5 comments. And I just had to keep on reading it till the last page as I couldn't stop reading it.