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CATIA V6 ESSENTIALS PDF

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CATIA V6 ESSENTIALS KOGENT LEARNING SOLUTIONS, INC. ESSENTIALS KOGENT LEARNING SOLUTIONS, INC. World Headquarters. Ormindale Way Mississauga, Ontario L5V 1J2 Canada. CATIA v6 sppn.info - [PDF Document]. CATIA V6 Essentials includes all the major concepts related. catia v6 tutorial for beginners pdf catia v6 essentials tutorial guide catia v5 tutorials mechanism design and animation book the reader with all of.


Catia V6 Essentials Pdf

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check out guide of Catia V6 Essentials written by sppn.info Mentoring It is presented with some downloading media such as a pdf, ppt, word, zip. Catia V6 Essentials - [PDF] [EPUB] Catia V6 Essentials CATIA V6 provides a number of workbenches to perform various design tasks. Download CATIA v6 sppn.info Description. Download CATIA v6 sppn.info Free in pdf format. Sponsored Ads. x. Product from site, Publisher.

In our case, two intersecting lines have been drawn, as shown in Figure 2. Click and drag the intersecting point of the lines. The cornered sketch is shown in Figure 2. The curve is created, after cornering the original sketch.

We next learn about the chamfering of sketches. The chamfering operation is used to chamfer sketches at a desired distance from the point of intersection in the Sketcher workbench.

In the case of designing the mechanical components, the chamfer operation is done on the original sketch. Perform the following steps to chamfer a sketch: Select the intersection of the sketch that you want to chamfer. In our case, the intersection of the two lines has been selected, as shown in Figure 2. Drag the cursor from the intersection and click it at the desired distance to chamfer the sketch as shown in Figure 2.

After chamfering a sketch, we next learn how to mirror a sketch. The mirroring operation is done by using the Mirror option of the Sketcher workbench. The mirroring operation is used to form a symmetrical image of the initial sketch. Perform the following steps for mirroring a sketch: Select the diameter of the semicircle which is the sketch to be mirrored , as shown in Figure 2.

Click the diameter of the semicircle to set the alignment of the mirror image that is mirrored Figure 2. After clicking, the semicircle mirror image is formed, as shown in Figure 2. After learning to mirror a sketch, we next learn how to rotate a sketch. The most common use of the rotate operation is to model a wheel or other rotating components of a sketch by determining the direction and distance covered by the component in a single rotation.

Perform the following steps for rotating a sketch: Select the line that you want to rotate, as shown in Figure 2. Specify the coordinate in the Sketcher workbench on the initial sketch along which the line is rotated Figure 2. In our case, it is specied as 50, Enter the degree for the angle by which the sketch will be rotated in the Rotation Denition dialog box.

In our case, the angle is degrees Figure 2. The rotated gure shown in Figure 2. In case you do not want to show the selected part of the sketch, clear the check box displaying the duplicate mode in the Rotation Denition dialog box. After learning the rotation of sketches, we next learn how to scale these sketches. Scaling a SketchThe Sketcher workbench provides the Scale option to scale existing sketches.

The scaling also known as dilation is a process used to compress or expand a sketch in either a vertical or horizontal direction. You can scale an entire sketch by resizing its dimensions. The scaling operation is commonly used in almost every sector of mechanical design to adjust the alignment of sketches. Perform the following steps for scaling a sketch: Select the sketch that you want to scale. In our case, we have selected all the sides of a rectangle, as shown in Figure 2. Select the point at which the original image is scaled.

In our case, the coordinate of the selected point of scaling is 45, 0 Figure 2. Enter the Scale Value in the Scale Denition dialog box.

In our case, we enter 0. The nal sketch is positioned at point 45, 0 and is scaled to scale value of 0. We have learned to modify the existing sketches in the Sketcher workbench, such as the mirroring, chamfering, and scaling operations. The sketches were drawn without imposing any constraints. In the next section, you learn to limit the shape as well as the orientation of the sketches by applying different types of constraints, such as geometrical, x together, and contact.

They can be applied to modify the shape, size, and position of the sketch in the Sketcher workbench. In comparison to the editing modication, the constraints can also be added on the sketches. The primary difference is that after imposing the constraints, the sketches cannot be further modied or edited.

Applying a dimensional constraint Applying a contact constraint Applying a x together constraint Applying the auto constraint Applying and removing multiple constraints The constraints discussed here can be applied to the attributes of geometrical shapes, such as, in the case of a circle, the radius, center, or the diameter. We start our discussion with applying geometrical constraints on sketches. Applying a Dimensional ConstraintA dimensional constraint affects the position and dimension of a sketch in the Sketcher workbench.

In other words, the dimensional constraints that are applied to geometric shapes limit the orientation of these geometric shapes. For example, geometrical constraints are applied to a circle to x its radius and center; after application on the circle, its radius and center cannot be modied in the Sketcher workbench. Select the sketch to which you want to apply the dimensional constraints. In our case, we select a circle, as shown in Figure 2. Click the mouse pointer on the sketch where you want to apply the constraint, as shown in Figure 2.

Now, if you drag the circle, you observe that you are unable to change the dimension of the circle, but only the position of the circle in the Sketcher workbench. In the next section, we apply the contact constraint to a sketch. Applying a Contact ConstraintThe contact constraint is applied to modify the existing sketches in such a manner that they exhibit certain properties such as tangency, concentricity, and coincidence. For example, the contact constraint can be applied on two or more sketches to make them coincident, concentric, or tangent to each other.

Perform the following steps to apply a contact constraint to a circle to make it concentric to an ellipse: Select the circle to which you want to apply the contact constraint Figure 2. Similarly, you can also create coincidence and tangency in sketches. Applying a Fix Together ConstraintThe x together constraint attaches one sketch with another. The two sketches are xed to each other such that they move together to any area in the Sketcher workbench.

Perform the following steps to apply the x together constraint to a sketch: Select two circles to which you want to apply the x together constraint, as shown in Figure 2. Now, if you drag any of the circles, both circles will move together, as shown in Figure 2.

This implies that the circles are not attached visibly but by behavior. After learning to apply the x together constraint, we next learn how to apply auto constraints on the sketch.

Applying the Auto ConstraintAll the possible constraints applicable on a particular sketch are applied after invoking the auto constraint. This is different from the rest of the constraints, where we need to apply each constraint individually, such as radius, length, and dimension. In the Sketcher workbench, auto constraint is the option that when applied to any object will set all the possible constraints according to that object instead of applying each constraint separately.

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Perform the following steps to apply an auto constraint to a sketch: Select the sketch to which you want to apply the auto constraints. In our case, we have selected a line on which we need to apply auto constraints, as shown in Figure 2. Select the sketch on which the auto constraint will be added. The selected sketch is added to the dialog box. In our case, we have selected the element to be constrained and 1 Line appears in the dialog box Figure 2.

Now, this line cannot be further modied. Apart from applying individual constraints, you can also apply and remove multiple constraints. In other words, you can either apply or remove constraints to a particular sketch from the Sketcher workbench.

Perform the following steps to apply multiple constraints to a sketch: Select the line to which you want to apply multiple constraints Figure 2.

The dialog box consists of a list of geometrical and dimensional constraints that are applied to a line along with the following constraints: Applies the length constraints for the selected sketches Fix: Fixes the location of the constraints, such as x the position of a line Horizontal: Fixes the horizontal constraint on the sketch 3. Select the Length and Horizontal check boxes to apply the length and horizontal constraints, respectively Figure 2.

Apart from applying constraints, you can also remove a constraint using the Constraint Denition dialog box. This can be done by clearing the check box associated with the constraint, in the Constraint Denition dialog box.

For example, if the check box containing the length constraint is cleared, then the length constraint is removed, as shown in Figure 2. Now, the discussion on constraints ends. We have learned to add various constraints to the sketches apart from drawing and editing these sketches. With this, you have reached the end of this chapter. We summarize all the topics covered in this chapter. Apart from creating solid models, the Part Design workbench is also used for advanced modeling of solid models, such as creating a hole, pocket, llet, and adding rectangular as well as circular patterns.

Moreover, the Part Design workbench is also used to modify the structure of a solid model by inserting an additional body into a solid model. The Part Design workbench contains several options for advanced modeling of the solid models. For example, the sketch-based features are used to create solid models of the sketches that are drawn in the Sketcher workbench. Similarly, the dress-up features are used to modify the solid models created in the Part Design workbench.

In addition, the transformation features are used to modify the solid models by transforming them along a direction, plane, or by symmetry. In this chapter, we learn to create the solid models by using the sketch-based, dress-up, and transformation features of the Part Design workbench. We also discuss the addition of a body into a solid model. It is required to rst draw the sketches in the Sketcher workbench and then create the solid model of these sketches in the Part Design workbench.

Apart from creating solid models, you can also modify the solid models in various ways by creating holes, pockets, and shafts using sketch-based features. In this section, we learn to use the following types of sketch-based features with solid models: The pad feature The shaft feature The pocket feature The hole feature The rib feature We start by discussing the use of the pad feature to create a solid model.

The Pad FeatureThe pad feature of the Part Design workbench is a feature that is commonly used to create a pad. A pad is created to add a solid base to a primary sketch that is drawn in the Sketcher workbench.

In other words, you can use the pad feature to draw the solid models for sketches, such as a rectangle, parallelogram, or circle. The default grid setting of the Sketcher workbench has been modied by changing the value of graduation settings as 20 mm. You can refer to Chapter 2 for procedures to change the graduation setting.

Perform the following steps to create a pad in the Part Design workbench: Specify the starting point at coordinate 55, 45 , which serves as the center of the hexagon Figure 3. Drag and click at this point to coordinate , 45 , as shown in Figure 3. Chapter 3Part Design Workbench4. Click the Exit workbench button in the toolbar of the Sketcher workbench, as shown in Figure 3.

Specify the length of the solid model. In our case, we have specied the length as 30 mm Figure 3. We next learn how to use the shaft feature to create a revolved model. The Shaft FeatureThe shaft feature of the Part Design workbench is used to create a revolving solid model. The sketch drawn in the Sketcher workbench is revolved around a specic axis at a specied angle.

You can nd the correct estimation of the orientation and revolution of a particular sketch while creating a revolved solid model. This data can be used for further improvement of the solid model.

Perform the following steps to create a shaft: Create a sketch in the Sketcher workbench. In our case, we have created a semicircle Figure 3. Specify the angle of rotation for the sketch. In our case, the rst angle is set to degrees in the Shaft Denition dialog box Figure 3.

In our case, we select Sketch. Select the axis in the Axis option along which the image will be rotated Figure 3. We next learn to use a pocket feature to remove a part from the solid model. The Pocket FeatureThe pocket feature of the Part Design workbench creates a pocket in the solid model by removing a selected portion from a solid model. The utility of the pocket feature is to form the resulting solid image by extruding different surfaces from a solid model. In other words, the utility of the pocket feature is the creation of a precise cut in the solid model to make a design or pattern with a cavity.

Perform the following steps to create a pocket: Create a shape in the Sketcher workbench. In our case, we create a parallelogram Figure 3. The Pad Denition dialog box appears Figure 3. The solid model after adding the pad feature is shown in Figure 3.

Open this solid model Figure 3. A new image will pop up, as shown in Figure 3. Modify the sketch shown in Figure 3. The nal sketch is shown in Figure 3.

Open the sketch Figure 3. It shows the default values for the pocket feature and preview in Figure 3. Set the Type option as Up to last limit to create a solid model by pushing out a xed cross section of the hexagon or extruding it completely through the initial solid model Figure 3. The Pocket Denition dialog box consists of First Limit sections that specify the several extensions of a pocket in the solid model, such as Up to next, Up to last, Up to plane.

The Up to last option species that the pocket would completely extrude through the initial solid model. In other words, the extruding Up to last option would push out the complete surface of the solid model. Select the sketch that would be added as a pocket of the solid model. In our case it is Sketch. The main utility of the pocket feature is to form a solid model by extruding different shapes, such as a circle, spline, ellipse, or rectangle.

After discussing the pocket feature, we next learn how to use the hole feature to create a hole in a solid model. The Hole FeatureThe hole feature of the Part Design workbench is used to create a hole in a solid model. You create a hole in a solid model to join two solid models. Perform the following steps to create a hole in a solid model: Create a cylindrical elongated hole in the Sketcher workbench Figure 3.

Create the solid model of the sketch by using the pad feature Figure 3. The nal model of the solid is shown in Figure 3. It reects the default values for the hole feature, as shown in Figure 3. The Up To Last option species that the hole would be added up to the last face of a solid model. In other words, the extruding Up To Last option would create a hole through the complete depth of the solid originating from the part of solid model that is selected. Select the default settings in the Type tab that is Simple, as a simple hole is being created Figure 3.

The Simple option is selected as the default hole. Apart from selecting the default setting, you can also draw some other types of hole, such as Tapered, Counterbored , Countersunk , and Counterdrilled by selecting different options from the drop-down list under the Type tab in the Hole Denition dialog box.

Click the OK button, as shown in Figure 3. The pocket feature is different from a hole in the shape, as the shapes formed by the result of the two operations are different.

A hole is circular in shape, whereas a pocket can be formed in any shape. After discussing the hole feature, we next learn how to use the rib feature for advanced modeling of solid models.

The curve and the prole are drawn in the Sketcher workbench and the rib feature is added in the Part Design workbench. In addition, the curve also acts as a reference along which the element prole is bent.

Perform the following steps to create a rib: Create a curve on which the rib would be formed in the Sketcher workbench. In our case, we create a spline Figure 3. Exit from the Part Design workbench by using the Sketch button of the Sketcher toolbar and open the curve Figure 3.

Draw a prole in the Sketcher workbench on which the rib feature is added. In our case, a parallelogram is sketched on the spline Figure 3. Select the Exit workbench button from the Sketcher workbench, as shown in Figure 3. Select the prole curve to create a rib Figure 3. The preview of the rib is displayed in Figure 3. All the sketches cannot be added in the Sketcher workbench at an instance; therefore, to add the new part in a different plane, we need to rst exit from the Sketcher workbench and reopen it in another plane.

The following are the basic requirements that form the basis for transition between the Sketcher and Part Design workbenches: When the requirement is to create a solid model of the sketch in the Part Design workbench using the pad feature and then add the additional sketch to the solid model, we need to switch from the Part Design workbench to the Sketcher workbench and add the additional features.

An example is adding a pocket. When the requirement is to create a sketch in the Sketcher workbench and modify it by adding a new sketch, we need to exit from the Sketcher workbench to the Part Design workbench and reopen the sketch in the Sketcher workbench. An example is creating a ribbed curve. We next learn how to add the dress-up feature to the existing sketches in the Part Design workbench.

While adding the dress-up features, you do not need to modify the initial sketch by drawing any additional sketches. You can directly apply the dress-up features on the solid model. In this section, we create solid models and add the following types of dress-up features: The llet feature The chamfer feature The draft feature The shell feature We start the discussion with the use of the llet feature.

The Fillet FeatureThe llet feature is used to create a rounded corner at the intersection of two surfaces. In addition, if a surface is selected, then all the edges corresponding to that surface are lleted. The edge llet feature The variable radius llet feature The faceface llet feature The tritangent llet feature The Edge Fillet Feature The edge llet feature is used to llet or round the sharpened edges of a solid model.

Perform the following steps to add an edge llet and create the edge-lleted solid model: In our case, we create a hexagon Figure 3. Create a solid model of the sketch by using the pad feature. The solid model created is shown in Figure 3. Select the edges that you want to llet. The number of selected edges would be shown in the Object s to llet box in the Edge Fillet Denition dialog box Figure 3. We next discuss the addition of a variable radius llet to a solid model. The Variable Radius Fillet Feature The variable radius llet feature is used to apply llets of varied radius to the different edges of the solid models.

Perform the following steps to create a variable radius lleted solid model: Create a solid model from the sketch of a parallelogram by using the pad feature, as shown in Figure 3.

Select the edge you want to llet. The number of selected edges is shown in the Edge s to llet box Figure 3. Set the radius of the llet by entering the appropriate value in the Radius option.

In our case, we set the radius of the llet applied on Edge2 to 5 mm, as shown in Figure 3. Repeat steps 3 and 4 to set the radius of the other edges. In our case, we have entered the radius of the second edge as 15 mm Figure 3. The nal solid model is shown in Figure 3. To apply the faceface llet, rst the faces of the solid model are selected and then the faceface llet feature is applied. Perform the following steps to create a faceface lleted solid model: Create a sketch consisting of two concentric circles in the Sketcher workbench Figure 3.

Create a solid model by using the pad feature in the Part Design workbench, as shown in Figure 3. Select the faces that you want to llet. In our case, the outer and inner faces are selected on which the faceface llet feature would be applied. The Tritangent Fillet Feature You apply the tritangent feature by rst selecting the two supporting faces and then selecting the face that would be removed to create the desired solid model. The lleted part of the sketch is tangent to the selected surfaces.

Perform the following steps to add a tritangent llet feature to the selected part of a solid: Create a solid model of the sketch by using the pad feature in the Part Design workbench.

In our case, the solid model created by using the pad feature is from the design of a parallelogram, as shown in Figure 3.

Select the rst face of the solid model to llet, as shown in Figure 3. After rotation the opposite face of the solid model is visible, as shown in Figure 3. Select the second face opposite to the previously selected face to llet, as shown in Figure 3. Select that face of the solid model that will be lleted Figure 3. In our case, Pad. The Chamfer FeatureThe chamfer feature is used to add a bevel face to the edge of a solid model.

The chamfer feature is applied to any edge of a solid model. However, in the case of chamfering adjacent faces of a solid model, the angle of the surface should always be less than 90 degrees. Perform the following steps to create a chamfered solid model: Create a solid model from a parallelogram sketched in the Sketcher workbench, as shown in Figure 3. Select any edge of the solid model to chamfer Figure 3. If any face of a solid model is selected to chamfer, then all the edges would be chamfered.

The nal chamfered sketch is shown in Figure 3. The process of drafting is done by tapering the solid model along its edges while preserving the basic structure of the model. The value of the taper angle species the extent of the drafting of the solid model. The taper angle is an angle by which the supporting edges are bent. However, the taper angle should be less than 90 degrees. Perform the following steps to create a drafted solid model: Create the model of a solid that you want to draft.

In our case, a solid model of a parallelogram sketched in the Sketcher workbench is created, as shown in Figure 3. It contains the default values for the faces to be drafted and the3.

Enter the desired angle by which you want the draft to be created. In our case, we have entered 50deg degree Figure 3. Select the face of the solid that would be drafted Figure 3. The Face s to draft box in the Draft Denition dialog box changes according to the selected faces. In our case, the number of faces to draft is 2. Select the neutral element.

In our case, we have selected Pad. After discussing the draft, we next discuss how to use a shell feature on a solid model. The Shell FeatureThe shell feature is used to create a solid model by removing the selected parts of a solid model in such a manner that the thickness of the sides remain. In other words, the shell feature removes the selected part of the entire solid model by a specied thickness.

Perform the following steps to create a shelled solid model: Create a solid model that you want to shell. In our case, the solid model is created from a sketch of a parallelogram, as shown in Figure 3. Select the face of the solid that would be removed to create a shelled solid model Figure 3. The Faces to remove box in the Shell Denition dialog box changes according to the selected faces.

The application of the dress-up features, such as llet, chamfer, draft, and shell, to solid models has been discussed. For example, you have learned to apply different types of llet features to the solid models.

Then the chamfer feature was used to chamfer a solid model. Next, the drafted solid model was created by using the draft feature. In the end, the shell feature was used to create a thin structure. In the next section, we discuss the transformation features that are applied to the solid models.

For example, the solid model can be moved, rotated, mirrored, scaled, and patterned by using the transformation features. Moreover, the basic structure of the solid model is not altered by applying the transformation features. For example, if the rotation is used to create a solid model, then the base of the solid model is not altered by rotation; only the orientation changes.

Following are the noteworthy transformation features that are used to transform the solid models: The Translation FeatureThe translation feature is applied on a solid model to displace it in a specic direction by selecting a plane and a specied distance in the Part Design workbench. The translation feature is used in designing solid models. Perform the following steps to create a translated solid model: In our case, we have created a hexagon Figure 3. Create a solid model using the pad feature Figure 3.

Click the Yes button in the Question message box, as shown in Figure 3. The other options are Point to Point and Coordinates that may be selected to specify the direction of the translation. In the case of Point to Point translation, you need to specify the starting and end point along which the solid model would be translated. In addition, to translate using the Coordinates option, you need to specify all of the coordinates.

Select the direction in the Direction option for the plane representations, along which the solid will be translated. In our case, we select the xy-plane Figure 3. You can also right-click on the Distance option and select a particular plane in which the translation would be directed. Enter the distance by which the solid model would be translated. In our case, we set the distance as 50 mm Figure 3.

This ends the section on translation of a solid model. After discussing the translation of a solid model, we next discuss how to rotate a solid model. The Rotation FeatureThe rotation feature is applied to a solid model to rotate the solid model about an axis.

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The utility of the rotation feature is to analyze the changes on the structure, symmetry, and orientation of the solid model after rotating the solid model. Depending upon the results of the rotation, the modications in the model can be further improved.

Perform the following steps to rotate a solid model: Create a solid model in the Part Design workbench that you want to rotate. In our case, the solid model is a parallelogram created in the Sketcher workbench, as shown in Figure 3. Click the Yes button, as shown in Figure 3. The AxisAngle option is selected in the Denition Mode drop-down list.

Other options are Axis-Two Elements and Three Points, which may be selected to specify the axis and angle of the rotation. In the Axis box, select the axis of rotation. In the Angle box, select the angle of rotation. Select one of the edges of the solid model as the axis of the rotation of the solid model, as shown in Figure 3. Enter the angle of rotation as 90 deg Figure 3. The preview of the rotated solid model is displayed in Figure 3. The Symmetry FeatureThe symmetry feature refers to the similar pattern or shape of a sketch or design with respect to a reference, such as the axis of symmetry.

In other words, the images on both sides of the axis of symmetry must be the same in the case of a symmetric axis. The axis of symmetry lies in the middle. In contrast, the images on both sides of an axis of symmetry need not be the same. Symmetric as well asymmetric shapes are shown in Figure 3. Symmetric gure: Both sides of the axis of symmetry are equal in shape and orientation Asymmetric gure: Both sides of the axis of symmetry are not similar In CATIA V6, the symmetric solid model is created by ipping a solid model around a point, line, plane, or a face.

These are called reference elements. The utility of the symmetry feature is to create a symmetrical solid model where the shape and orientation is similar with respect to a reference element. Perform the following steps to create a symmetric solid model: Create a solid model in Part Design workbench. In our case, the solid model is a circle created in the Sketcher workbench, as shown in Figure 3. Click the Yes button. The Symmetry Denition dialog box is activated with a focus on the Reference box Figure 3.

Select the face of the solid model along which the reference element is created Figure 3. After creating the symmetry of a solid model, we next learn to mirror solid models. The Mirror FeatureThe mirror feature is used to mirror either a part of or the entire solid model. The initial sketch can be mirrored either along a plane or a face. When the mirror feature is added to a solid model, the initial part is retained and the mirror of the solid model is created.

Perform the following steps to create a mirrored solid model: Select the face of a solid model created. In our case, we have selected the face of a semicircle, as shown in Figure 3. After discussing the mirroring of a solid model, we next learn how to create patterned solid models using the pattern feature. The Pattern FeatureA pattern refers to a specific design. In CATIA V6, a patterned solid model is a solid model that has a continuous pattern designed throughout its entire face. The rectangular pattern feature The circular pattern feature We next discuss how to use the rectangular pattern feature to create a rectangularpatterned solid model.

The Rectangular Pattern Feature The rectangular pattern feature is used to arrange the selected item in a rectangular manner. In other words, by using the rectangular pattern feature, you can arrange any shape, such as a rectangle, circle, or hexagon, to the solid model in a rectangular way. Create a solid model of a parallelogram in the Part Design workbench on which the rectangular pattern will be added, as shown in Figure 3.

Open the sketch in the Sketcher workbench in the xy-plane, as shown in Figure 3. Add the shape to the sketch. In our case, a hexagon is added to the solid model, as shown in Figure 3. Open the sketch in the Part Design workbench, as shown in Figure 3. Add a pocket to the solid model. The solid model after adding the pocket is shown in Figure 3. The Rectangular Pattern Denition dialog box contains the following options required to add a pattern: Selects a parameter for pattern, such as length and space Instance s: Species the number of instances of the pattern created Spacing: Species the space between two instances of shapes Reference element: Species the face, line, or axis of the solid along which the pattern should be added Object: Selects the object on the solid model that is to be patterned 7.

Select the option from the Parameters drop-down list. Select the number of instances of the pattern as 4 in the Instance s box Figure 3. Select the spacing between instances as 30 mm in the Spacing box Figure 3. Select the face of the solid along which the pattern should be added by specifying the Reference element Figure 3. The Reference element in the Rectangular Pattern Denition dialog box shows the selected face of the solid model.

In our case, the Reference element is Pad. Select the pocket, which is added as a pattern in the solid model. In our case, it is a hexagon Figure 3. The Circular Pattern Feature The circular pattern feature is used to arrange a selected item in a circular manner. In other words, you can arrange any shape, such as rectangle, hexagon, spline, or circle, on a solid model in a circular manner. Perform the following steps to add a circular pattern feature to a solid model. Create a solid model in the Part Design workbench to which the pattern will be added.

In our case the solid model created is a rectangle, as shown in Figure 3. Open the solid model in the xy-plane of the Sketcher workbench to add a circular pattern, as shown in Figure 3. Add the shape to the sketch in the Sketcher workbench. In our case we add a circle, as shown in Figure 3. The gure of the solid model after adding the pocket is shown in Figure 3.

Enter the instances of the patterns as 12 in the Instance s box Figure 3. Enter the angular spacing between the instances as 45 deg in the Angular spacing box Figure 3. Select the reference element on which the pattern will be added Figure 3. The Reference element in the Circular Pattern Denition dialog box shows the selected face of the solid model. Select the pocket that is added as a pattern Figure 3.

The preview is displayed Figure 3. In this section, you have learned to transform solid models using transformation features such as translation, rotation, symmetry, mirroring, and patterns rectangular and circular. We next learn how to insert additional bodies into a solid model. The additional bodies are included under the PartBody node of the specication tree.

When an additional body is added, the new body, Body. Perform the following steps to insert an additional body into an existing solid model: Create the solid model to which you want to insert a body. In our case, a solid model of a rectangle is created, as shown in Figure 3.

Open the sketch in the Sketcher workbench in xy-plane, as shown in Figure 3. Add the new sketch to the existing solid model, as shown in Figure 3. Open the sketch in the Part Design workbench.

The new sketch is added as the additional body Body. Create the nal solid model using the pad feature. The nal sketch with the additional solid body added is shown in Figure 3. You have learned about the Part Design workbench in detail, including the sketchbased, dress-up, and transformation features.

In addition, you also learned to create and modify different types of solid models using all three features. Lastly, you have learned to add additional bodies to a solid model.

With this, we have reached the end of this chapter. Lets summarize what you learned in this chapter. The current chapter takes you one step forward in the same direction by describing how to create designs that consist of two or more solid models. The process of creating assemblies is known as assembly modeling. This chapter begins with a discussion on how to create an assembly. Then you learn how to work with assembly components, such as replacing, showing, and hiding an assembly component.

Finally, the various assembly features are discussed. We rst begin with creating an assembly. Therefore, the task of creating an assembly is divided into the following two subtasks: Creating components for the assembly 2.

Assembling the components We next learn to perform these subtasks. To create a component, you rst need to draw the sketch of the component. The Sketcher workbench can be used to draw the sketch of the component. After that, you can convert this sketch into a solid model in the Part Design workbench. Perform the following steps to create components for an assembly: Enter a name for the rst component in the Representation Name text box Figure 4. In our case, we have entered Part1.

Now, you need to draw the sketch of the component using the Sketcher workbench.

You can invoke the Sketcher workbench by rst clicking the Sketch button on the Sketcher toolbar and then selecting a sketching plane from the specication tree.

Click the Sketch button on the Sketcher toolbar Figure 4. Select the xy-plane option in the specication tree, as shown in Figure 4. Draw a sketch in the Sketcher workbench Figure 4. Click the Exit workbench button on the Workbench toolbar to exit the Sketcher workbench, as shown in Figure 4. You can convert a sketch into a solid model by using the pad feature available in the Part Design workbench. Now, you need to create other assembly components. In our case, we create three more assembly components, which have the same basic geometries as that of the three empty portions of the rst assembly component.

Repeat steps 2 to 10 to create the second component for the assembly that can t into the rst empty portion of the Part1 component, as shown in Figure 4. Repeat steps 2 to 10 to create the third component for the assembly that can t into the second empty portion of the Part1 component, as shown in Figure 4. Repeat steps 2 to 10 to create the fourth component for your assembly that can t into the third empty portion of the Part1 component, as shown in Figure 4.

The next section discusses how to assemble individual assembly components. When you start the Assembly Design workbench, by default a blank assembly is created. You can then add all the components to the blank assembly to form the nal assembly. Perform the following steps to learn how to assemble different components to create an assembly: In the Start Step 1 Product dialog box, by default the Product option, which creates a new product, is selected in the Favorites group.

We continue with the default settings in the Start Step 1 Product dialog box. Click the Next button to continue, as shown in Figure 4. Enter a name for the assembly in the Part Number text box Figure 4. In our case, we have entered Product. Select the From Session tab to open the page associated with this tab Figure 4.

Click the Retrieve Loaded Data button, as shown in Figure 4. Select the rst component, Part1 Figure 4. Click the OK button to close the Select representations to insert dialog box, as shown in Figure 4. Repeat steps 5 to 9 to add the second component, Part2, to the Product assembly, as shown in Figure 4. Repeat steps 5 to 9 to add the third component, Part3, to the Product assembly, as shown in Figure 4. Repeat steps 5 to 9 to add the fourth component, Part4, to the Product assembly, as shown in Figure 4.

We next learn how to work with assembly components. In this section, you learn to perform the following operations on the assembly components: Replacing assembly components Showing and hiding assembly components We next begin with replacing assembly components.

For this purpose, you need to rst create a new assembly component and then replace the existing assembly component with the newly created assembly component. While creating a new component to replace an existing assembly component, you need to ensure that the new component has the same basic geometry as that of the original component.

In such case, the new component is placed at the same location inside the assembly where the original component was placed. Otherwise, the new component should be placed at a different location.

Create an assembly in the Assembly Design workbench, as shown in Figure 4. Enter a name for the new component in the Representation Name text box Figure 4. In our case, we have entered NewPart. Now, you need to draw the sketch of the new component using the Sketcher workbench. Enter 50 mm in the Length box in the First Limit group Figure 4. You can delete an assembly component by right-clicking the component in the specication tree and selecting the Delete option from the context menu.

Select the From Session tab Figure 4. Select the NewPart component Figure 4. We next learn how to show and hide assembly components. Showing and Hiding Assembly ComponentsYou can show or hide components in an assembly without permanently deleting the components from the assembly. Perform the following steps to show and hide components in an assembly: Create an assembly in the Assembly Design workbench Figure 4.

You have also learned to show and hide an assembly component. The next section discusses how to use assembly features in an assembly.

These features include the hole feature, the protected feature, and the spilt feature. You can use these features to create an assembly hole, an assembly protected, and an assembly split. In this section, you learn how to use the following three assembly features: The hole feature The protected feature The split featureUsing the Hole FeatureYou can use the hole feature to create an assembly hole in an assembly component.

While creating an assembly hole, you need to specify dimensions for the hole. When you use the hole feature, a new product is created in the specication tree and a link is created between this new product and the component of the assembly where you want to create a hole. Perform the following steps to use the hole feature: Click the Launch Assembly Feature Denition button on the Creation toolbar to prevent the Assembly Feature Denition dialog box from appearing at the end of hole creation Figure 4.

Click the Specication in No Show button on the Creation toolbar to show the hole at the end of its creation Figure 4. Select the component of the assembly in which you want to create a hole, as shown in Figure 4.

Click the OK button to close the message box, as shown in Figure 4. Specify the options, such as diameter and depth of the hole, in the Hole Denition dialog box Figure 4.

In our case, we have just changed the depth of the hole in the Depth text box from 10 mm to 50 mm. Using the Protected FeatureYou can use the protected feature to create an assembly protected on an assembly component.

An assembly protected is a structure built on a component of an assembly and it can be any of the shapes, such as a prism, a sweep, and a revolve. Perform the following steps to use the protected feature: Click the Launch Assembly Feature Denition button on the Creation toolbar to prevent the Assembly Feature Denition dialog box from appearing at the end of the creation of assembly protected Figure 4.

Click the Specication in No Show button on the Creation toolbar to show the assembly protected at the end of its creation Figure 4.

Select the component of the assembly in which you want to create an assembly protected, as shown in Figure 4. You can use this feature to remove an assembly hole or assembly protected from an assembly.

Perform the following steps to use the split feature: Click the Launch Assembly Feature Denition button on the Creation toolbar to prevent the Assembly Feature Denition dialog box from appearing at the end of the split operation Figure 4. Click the Specication in No Show button on the Creation toolbar to show the result of the split operation Figure 4. Select the assembly feature that you want to cut, as shown in Figure 4. Select the component from which you want to remove the feature, as shown in Figure 4.

Click the OK button to close the Cut dialog box, as shown in Figure 4. Wireframe elements are sketches used to create surfaces, which are three-dimensional 3D models without any thickness and mass properties.

The process of creating surfaces is known as surface modeling. The Wireframe and Surface Design workbench provides a number of options for surface modeling that helps in product styling by providing a unique shape to the product components.

These options also help to make the product more attractive and presentable. This chapter helps you learn how to create wireframe elements and surfaces.

First, you learn how to create different wireframe elements, such as a point, line, plane, and circle. After that, the creation of different types of surfaces, such as an extruded surface, revolved surface, spherical surface, cylindrical surface, offset surface, swept surface, ll surface, and multi-sections surface, is discussed. We begin with creating wireframe elements. Examples of wireframe elements are a point, line, plane, and circle. Using the wireframe elements, you can draw sketches to create surfaces in the Wireframe and Surface Design workbench instead of the Sketcher workbench.

In this section, you learn to create the following four wireframe elements: Point Line Plane Circle We begin with creating a point.

Creating a PointWhile creating a point in the Wireframe and Surface Design workbench, you need to specify all three coordinates x-coordinate, y-coordinate, and z-coordinate for the point to be created. Perform the following steps to create a point in the Wireframe and Surface Design workbench: Enter a name for the representation in the Representation Name text box Figure 5. In our case, we have entered 10 mm.

In our case, we have entered 20 mm. In our case, we have entered 30 mm. We next learn how to create a line in the Wireframe and Surface Design workbench.

Creating a LineYou can create a line in the Wireframe and Surface Design workbench either by creating the starting and ending points for the line or by selecting two existing points as the starting and ending points for the line.

Perform the following steps to create a line in the Wireframe and Surface Design workbench: Start the Wireframe and Surface Design workbench. In our case, we have entered 50 mm. In addition to these three default planes, the Wireframe and Surface Design workbench of CATIA V6 allows you to create additional planes by taking any of these planes as the reference plane. You generally need to create an additional plane while drawing a sketch relative to an already drawn sketch.

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Such planes help to give a more exact and appropriate shape to your surfaces. Perform the following steps to create a plane: The reference plane is added to the Reference box in the Plane Denition dialog box Figure 5. NET Framework 3. Table 1. The minimum recommended hard disk space of 4 GB is required to store program executables, program data, and usage environment. TABLE 1. An active Ethernet adapter is required for licensing purposes. A graphic color display that is compatible with the selected platform-specific graphic adapter.

The minimum resolution for Windows workstations is A graphic adapter with a 3D OpenGL accelerator is required. A three-button mouse is required as a pointing device. Windows XP, Windows Vista. A message box opens, as shown in Figure 1. Click the Next button to continue, as shown in Figure 1. In any case, the destination folder should be empty. Click the Yes button to close the Conrm creation of directory message box, as shown in Figure 1.

Select a setup type: Complete or Custom Figure 1. In our case, we have kept the default option, Complete, selected. Click the Browse button to select the Java home path on your computer, as shown in Figure 1. In our case, we have selected the jre1. Click the Install button to continue, as shown in Figure 1. You can also notice in Figure 1. This ensures improved working of the PLM cycle and also allows multiple users to simultaneously work on a single product.

This dialog box allows you to select a data source to store your1. If you select a 3D XML data source, you need not enter a user name and password. Click the More button in the Connect dialog box to select a data source, as shown in Figure 1.

Click the Add New Connection button to add a new connection, as shown in Figure 1. Select a connection type from the Connection Type drop-down list. Click the Open button, as shown in Figure 1. Click the OK button to close the Discovery dialog box, as shown in Figure 1. Click the OK button to close the Connect dialog box, as shown in Figure 1.

Workbenches are grouped into workbench categories. The Sample. Enter a name for the representation in the Representation Name text box Figure 1. In our case, we continue with the default name, Representation1. Move the mouse pointer over the button that displays the name of the current workbench, on the Workbench toolbar, to know which workbench you are working with, as shown in Figure 1. The CATIA V6 user interface contains a menu bar, various toolbars, and other components, such as specication tree and compass, to help you perform your design tasks.

Figure 1. Menu BarA menu bar is a collection of menus, each of which contains a set of options for performing various tasks. The number of menus displayed on the menu bar depends on the currently active workbench.

You can use the specication tree to view or edit data. It allows you to change the orientation of parts, assemblies, or sketches. Using the 3D compass, you can also change the orientation of the views of parts and assemblies.

The 3D compass is displayed in Figure 1. It serves the purpose of providing the user transparent access to PLM information at any time, on any object. The compass consists of ve parts: The Compass is shown in Figure 1. People West: Shape and Representation South: Structure East: Allows you to access owner information.

Shape and Representation: Allows you to access modication status information. Allows you to access structure information.

Links and Knowledge: Allows you to access links and knowledge information. Play button: Allows you to play simulations. You can use any of these planes for drawing the sketch of a model shape. The orientation of a model depends on its sketch; therefore, you should carefully select the sketching plane for drawing the sketch of the model.

X, Y, and Z. Each of these axes represents a direction that is perpendicular to each of the other two axes. These axes represent the length, width, and height depth of an object.

Search, Impact, Collaborate, and Propagate. For example, the menu in Figure 1. Each of the four bar domains consists of two parts: The purpose of each of the bar domains is as follows: Search domain: Allows you to search objects by dening search criteria. Impact domain: Allows you to examine links and relations between objects. Collaborate domain: Enables instant collaboration between all participants across the extended enterprise to help them share data and ideas.

Propagate domain: We now summarize the main topics covered in this chapter. The workbench consists of several options, such as the menu bar, Sketcher toolbar, and Sketch button that are used to create the design of an object. CATIA provides a number of workbenches that suit a particular design objective. They consist of all the functionalities required to create the designs in that workbench. For example, the Part Design workbench is used to create the solid model and the Sketcher workbench is used to draw basic sketches.

For this purpose, the Sketcher workbench consists of various options for creating different types of shapes such as point, line, circle, and rectangle. Similarly, the Part Design workbench consists of the functionalities to create and modify the solid models such as sketch-bases and dress-up features. In this chapter, we discuss the Sketcher workbench in detail, including the invoking of the Sketcher workbench and drawing of various shapes in the Sketcher workbench such as a line, circle, conic, prole, spline, and hexagon.

Editing and modication of the existing shapes are also discussed in the chapter.

Finally, applying and removing different types of constraints on the sketches are discussed in detail. We begin the chapter with learning to invoke the Sketcher workbench. Before working on designs of the sketches, it is essential to invoke the Sketcher workbench. Before invoking the Sketcher workbench, it is required to start the Part Design workbench Figure 2. The steps for invoking the Part Design workbench are discussed in Chapter 1. Perform the following steps to invoke the Sketcher workbench after starting the Part Design workbench: Click the Sketch button in the Sketcher toolbar on the part design Figure 2.

Apart from the Sketch button the Sketcher toolbar also contains a Positioned Sketch button that is used to invoke a Sketcher workbench. We have invoked the Sketcher workbench by using Sketch button in the Sketcher toolbar. Click on any one of the planes in the specication tree, according to which the Sketcher workbench invoked. In our case, we have clicked the xy-plane, as shown in Figure 2. Before drawing the sketches, you can change the units and grid settings of the Sketcher workbench, if required.

However, the settings facilitate the precise sketching of shapes in the Sketcher workbench. You can change the unit settings by opening the Units tab.

Perform the following steps to open the Units tab: Chapter 2Sketcher Workbench2. Select the Parameters and Measures section that is displayed under the General node Figure 2. Select the Units tab, as shown in Figure 2. Apart from unit settings, you can also change the grid settings, by opening the Sketcher tab.

Perform the following steps to open the Sketcher tab to change the grid settings. Select the Sketcher option present under the Mechanical Design node.

The Sketcher tab opens, as shown in Figure 2. Helps to change the dimension of the grid, snap to point, and allow distortions.

Sketch Plane: Helps to position the sketch plane parallel to the screen and visualization of the cursor coordinates.

Helps to create the additional elements in the geometry. Helps to create geometrical shapes, such as circle and ellipse. Helps to specify the color of the drawing in the Sketcher workbench. In this chapter, we set the graduation settings at 20 mm so that we can draw precise objects, such as a point, line, and rectangle. We have learned how to invoke the Sketcher workbench and congure the settings of the Units and Sketcher options.

We next learn to draw an object in the Sketcher workbench. In this section, we learn to draw the following shapes on the Sketcher workbench: Drawing PointsA point is drawn on the basis of x and y coordinates.

The point is the most common object drawn in the Sketcher workbench. For example, you can draw a point without displaying its coordinates or a point whose coordinates are displayed. In addition, you can also represent a point on other geometrical shapes, such as a circle, line, or conic. In this section, we learn to draw points. Drawing an Arbitrary Point In the Sketcher workbench, you can create a point without providing the specic coordinates. In other words, an arbitrary point is located anywhere on the Sketcher30Chapter 2Sketcher Workbenchworkbench.

You can create an arbitrary point by locating a position for that point anywhere in the Sketcher workbench. The nal position of the point can be xed by clicking the mouse at a desired location. Perform the following steps to draw a point in the Sketcher workbench: Click anywhere to x a specic point in the Sketcher workbench. In our case, we specify the point at coordinate 30, 30 in the Sketcher workbench. The point is drawn successfully, as shown in Figure 2.

Instead of the default gure, additional details have been provided in the gure to improve the clarity for the reader. Apart from this, you can also draw a point by using the coordinates. We next discuss how to create a point in the Sketcher workbench by using coordinates. Drawing a Point Specifying Coordinates The Point-Using Coordinate is a procedure that refers to the drawing of a point on the basis of the specic coordinates.

In other words, prior to drawing a point, you need to provide its coordinates in the Point Denition dialog box. Moreover, the position of a point changes as per the change in the coordinates. Perform the following steps to draw a point using particular coordinates in the Sketcher workbench: Enter the value for the horizontal position of the point, under the Cartesian tab, in the Point Denition dialog box.

In our case, the horizontal distance is 30 mm. Enter the value for the vertical position of the point, under the Cartesian tab in the Point Denition dialog box. In our case, the vertical distance is 30 mm. Click the OK button, as shown in Figure 2.

After discussing how to draw a point, we next learn how to draw lines. Drawing LinesYou can draw a line as well as an innite line by using the Insert menu in the Sketcher workbench. In this section, we learn to draw the following types of lines: Lines Innite Lines Drawing a Line You can sketch a line to draw a variety of shapes, such as a triangle, tangent, or parallelogram, in the Sketcher workbench.

You can draw a line in the Sketcher workbench by rst clicking on the starting point of the line, and then dragging the line to the desired length. Perform the following steps to draw a line on the Sketcher workbench: Click and drag the mouse pointer from the starting point coordinates to the end point of the line up to where you want to limit the length of the line. In our case, the starting point coordinates of the line are 15, 15 and the end point coordinates are , 15 , as shown in Figure 2.

After learning to draw a line, we next draw an innite line. These lines are generally used for advanced modeling of objects such as aircraft modeling. Perform the following steps to draw an innite line on the Sketcher workbench: Specify a position, then drag the mouse and click at the position where you want to set the innite line.

In our case, the innite line is passing through coordinates 0, 0. Now, the nal line is drawn, as shown in Figure 2. After learning to draw an innite line, we next learn how to draw rectangles. Drawing RectanglesThe rectangles that are drawn in the Sketcher workbench can be a centered rectangle or an oriented rectangle.

You can draw a rectangle in the Sketcher workbench by selecting the Rectangle option in the Proles submenu under the Insert menu. However, in the centered rectangle, you rst need to set the center of the rectangle before drawing the rectangle.

In this section, we learn how to: Draw a rectangle Draw a centered rectangle Drawing a Rectangle You can draw a rectangle anywhere in the Sketcher workbench.

Perform the following steps to draw a rectangle on the Sketcher workbench: Click and drag the mouse pointer from coordinate 35, 35 to , 5. The nal rectangle drawn is shown in Figure 2.

After learning to draw a simple rectangle, we now learn how to draw a centered rectangle. Drawing a Centered Rectangle The centered rectangle is a rectangle where the center of the rectangle is specied. You rst select a point as the center and then draw the rectangle.

Perform the following steps to draw a rectangle with a center on the Sketcher workbench: Click and drag the mouse pointer from a point with coordinates 20, 20 center of the rectangle to another point with coordinates 50, 20 that serves as the dimension of the rectangle. The nal rectangle is drawn, as shown in Figure 2. Instead of the default gure, additional details have been provided in the gure to improve clarity for the reader. Now, after learning to draw a centered rectangle, we learn to draw different types of circles.

Drawing CirclesThe circle is an important and basic sketch from which various types of models are drawn. For example, to draw the model consisting of a wheel or a sphere, the drawing of a circle is necessary.

In this section, you learn to: Draw a circle Draw a three-point circle Draw a circle using coordinates Draw an arc Drawing a Circle The center of the circle is specied when drawing a circle in the Sketcher workbench. The dimensions of the circle changes as per the movement of the mouse pointer from the center. Perform the following steps to draw a circle on the Sketcher workbench: Click and drag the mouse pointer starting from the coordinate 20, 20 , which serves as the center of the circle, to a point 80, 20 to limit the circumference of the circle.

The nal circle is drawn, as shown in Figure 2. Now, the procedure to draw a simple circle is complete. Next, we learn how to draw a three-point circle. Drawing a Three-Point Circle The three-point circle is a type of circle that passes through three points that specify the orientation of the circle in the Sketcher workbench. Perform the following steps to draw a three-point circle on the Sketcher workbench: Specify the starting point for the three-point circle.

In our case, this coordinate is 55, 35 , as shown in Figure 2. Click and drag the rst point to the desired second point, through which the circle will pass. In our case, the line is dragged from the rst point 55, 35 to44Chapter 2Sketcher Workbenchthe second point 85, The dotted line that appears from the rst point to the second point is known as the radius of the circle, as shown in Figure 2.

Specify the third point to complete the circle. In our case, we specied the third point at coordinate 70, 15 , as shown in Figure 2.

After drawing the three-point circle, we draw a circle using coordinates. Drawing a Circle Using Coordinates You can draw a circle using coordinates by specifying its coordinates and radius in the Sketcher workbench. The coordinates specify the position of the circle and the radius species its dimension circumference in the Sketcher workbench. Perform the following steps to draw a circle using coordinates on the Sketcher workbench: Enter the horizontal and vertical distances as 50 mm, in the Cartesian tab of the Circle Denition dialog box.

Enter the radius as 20 mm in the Circle Denition dialog box. After learning to draw a circle using coordinates, we next learn how to draw an arc. In this section, an arc with the center as 30, 30 and points 40, 40 and 40, 20 is drawn. Perform the following steps to draw an arc using coordinates in the Sketcher workbench: This point in the Sketcher workbench works as the center of the arc.

Move the mouse pointer from the rst point 30, 30 to a second point 40, 40 through which the circle will pass Figure 2. Move the mouse pointer from the second point 40, 40 to the third point 40, 20 to complete the arc formation, as shown in Figure 2. After learning to draw all the shapes related to a circle, we now learn how to draw proles.

Drawing ProlesThe prole is a shape that is formed by continuous lines or arcs. In this section, a prole consisting of three lines is drawn. Perform the following steps to draw a prole in the Sketcher workbench: This point in the Sketcher workbench serves as the starting point of the prole.

Click and drag the mouse pointer from the rst point 30, 30 to another point 60, 60 , as shown in Figure 2. Draw the other lines in a prole, such as a second line from position 60, 60 to 30, 60 and a third line from position 30, 60 to 30, The nal prole drawn is displayed in Figure 2.

The length of the rst line is from point 30, 30 to 60, The second line is drawn from 60, 60 to 30, And the last line is drawn from 30, 60 to 30, Drawing ConicsThe conic is a geometrical shape that is drawn by cutting the various cross sections of a cone.

For example, you can form a circle, ellipse, parabola, and hyperbola from a conic, as shown in Figure 2. In the following sections, you learn to draw the following conics: Drawing an ellipse Drawing a parabola by focus Now, we learn to draw an ellipse in the Sketcher workbench.

Drawing an Ellipse An ellipse is a geometrical shape that is formed by cutting a conic with a plane. In this section, we learn to draw an ellipse with the center as the origin 0, 0. Perform the following steps to draw an ellipse in the Sketcher workbench: Specify the center of the ellipse by clicking the mouse pointer. In our case, we specify the center at coordinate 0, 0. This point in the Sketcher workbench serves as the center of the ellipse Figure 2.

Drag the cursor from the center to the second point. In our case, the center is at coordinate 0, 0 and the second point is at coordinate 70, 0.

The second point determines the orientation of the ellipse, as shown in Figure 2. Specify the third point 50, 30 on the ellipse to determine the minor axis of the ellipse Figure 2. The gure of the ellipse after all the parameters i. The nal ellipse after clicking the mouse pointer on the position 50, 30 is shown in Figure 2. After learning to draw an ellipse, we next draw a parabola by focus.

Parabola by focus is drawn by rst locating its focus and then locating its vertex to nalize its orientation. Perform the following steps to draw a conic in the Sketcher workbench: Specify a coordinate that serves as the focus of the parabola. In our case, the coordinate is specied at 20, 0 in the Sketcher workbench Figure 2. Draw the parabola through the point 0, 0 , as shown in Figure 2. Chapter 2Sketcher WorkbenchNote: We have learned to draw sketches of several shapes in the Sketcher workbench, such as a point, line, circle, and conic, after invoking the Sketcher workbench.

Apart from creating the different types of shapes, you can also modify these sketches. CATIA V6 provides facilities to edit and modify these sketches by using various methods, such as trimming, chamfering, cornering, and mirroring. In the following section, we learn to edit and modify existing sketches. In addition to drawing different shapes, it also provides the facility to edit these shapes which have been previously drawn in the Sketcher workbench.

For example, if a rectangle is already drawn in the Sketcher workbench, then we can either trim any one of the sides or quick trim the entire sketch at any point of time. A user can perform the following activities for editing sketches: Trimming Quick Trimming Extending Cornering Chamfering Mirroring Rotating Scaling We start by editing and modifying a sketch with the trimming operations that is used to remove either a part of or the entire sketch.

Trimming a SketchThe Sketcher workbench provides the Trim tool that helps remove either unwanted sections or intersected portions of a sketch. For example, lets assume that there are two intersecting circles on which we intend to perform the trim operation.

Perform the following steps to trim the sketch: Select the part of the sketch that you want to trim.

In our case, we have selected a section of intersecting circles, as shown in Figure 2. Move the mouse pointer and click to the selected part of the sketch Figure 2.

The selected part of the sketch is trimmed, as shown in Figure 2. After performing the trimming operation, we next learn the quick-trimming feature. The Quick Trim option helps you to speedily trim the entire sketch.

It is different from the trim operation that removes only a selected part of the sketch. Perform the following steps to quick trim a sketch: In our case, we select a section of the intersecting circles, as shown in Figure 2. Click on the selected part of the sketch that is to be quick trimmed Figure 2.

The quick-trimmed sketch appears, as shown in Figure 2. After learning to quick trim a sketch, we next learn how to extend a sketch. For example, you can connect a line to a circle or connect two different lines by extending a sketch. Perform the following steps to extend a sketch: Select the line that you want to extend, as shown in Figure 2.

Click and drag the tip of the selected line Figure 2. The line is extended, as shown in Figure 2. After learning the extending operation, we next learn how to corner a sketch.

Cornering a SketchThe Corner option is used to create a smooth corner at the intersection of two lines. In other words, the cornering operation is used to smooth the sharp edges of a sketch. Perform the following steps to corner a sketch: Select the sketch that you want to corner. In our case, two intersecting lines have been drawn, as shown in Figure 2.

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Click and drag the intersecting point of the lines. The cornered sketch is shown in Figure 2. The curve is created, after cornering the original sketch. We next learn about the chamfering of sketches. The chamfering operation is used to chamfer sketches at a desired distance from the point of intersection in the Sketcher workbench.

In the case of designing the mechanical components, the chamfer operation is done on the original sketch. Perform the following steps to chamfer a sketch: Select the intersection of the sketch that you want to chamfer.

In our case, the intersection of the two lines has been selected, as shown in Figure 2. Drag the cursor from the intersection and click it at the desired distance to chamfer the sketch as shown in Figure 2. After chamfering a sketch, we next learn how to mirror a sketch.

The mirroring operation is done by using the Mirror option of the Sketcher workbench. The mirroring operation is used to form a symmetrical image of the initial sketch. Perform the following steps for mirroring a sketch: Select the diameter of the semicircle which is the sketch to be mirrored , as shown in Figure 2. Click the diameter of the semicircle to set the alignment of the mirror image that is mirrored Figure 2. After clicking, the semicircle mirror image is formed, as shown in Figure 2.

After learning to mirror a sketch, we next learn how to rotate a sketch. The most common use of the rotate operation is to model a wheel or other rotating components of a sketch by determining the direction and distance covered by the component in a single rotation. Perform the following steps for rotating a sketch: Select the line that you want to rotate, as shown in Figure 2. Specify the coordinate in the Sketcher workbench on the initial sketch along which the line is rotated Figure 2.

In our case, it is specied as 50, Enter the degree for the angle by which the sketch will be rotated in the Rotation Denition dialog box. In our case, the angle is degrees Figure 2. The rotated gure shown in Figure 2. In case you do not want to show the selected part of the sketch, clear the check box displaying the duplicate mode in the Rotation Denition dialog box.

After learning the rotation of sketches, we next learn how to scale these sketches. Scaling a SketchThe Sketcher workbench provides the Scale option to scale existing sketches. The scaling also known as dilation is a process used to compress or expand a sketch in either a vertical or horizontal direction. You can scale an entire sketch by resizing its dimensions.

The scaling operation is commonly used in almost every sector of mechanical design to adjust the alignment of sketches.

Perform the following steps for scaling a sketch: Select the sketch that you want to scale. In our case, we have selected all the sides of a rectangle, as shown in Figure 2.

Select the point at which the original image is scaled. In our case, the coordinate of the selected point of scaling is 45, 0 Figure 2. Enter the Scale Value in the Scale Denition dialog box. In our case, we enter 0. The nal sketch is positioned at point 45, 0 and is scaled to scale value of 0. We have learned to modify the existing sketches in the Sketcher workbench, such as the mirroring, chamfering, and scaling operations.

The sketches were drawn without imposing any constraints. In the next section, you learn to limit the shape as well as the orientation of the sketches by applying different types of constraints, such as geometrical, x together, and contact.

They can be applied to modify the shape, size, and position of the sketch in the Sketcher workbench. In comparison to the editing modication, the constraints can also be added on the sketches. The primary difference is that after imposing the constraints, the sketches cannot be further modied or edited. Applying a dimensional constraint Applying a contact constraint Applying a x together constraint Applying the auto constraint Applying and removing multiple constraints The constraints discussed here can be applied to the attributes of geometrical shapes, such as, in the case of a circle, the radius, center, or the diameter.

We start our discussion with applying geometrical constraints on sketches. Applying a Dimensional ConstraintA dimensional constraint affects the position and dimension of a sketch in the Sketcher workbench.

In other words, the dimensional constraints that are applied to geometric shapes limit the orientation of these geometric shapes. For example, geometrical constraints are applied to a circle to x its radius and center; after application on the circle, its radius and center cannot be modied in the Sketcher workbench. Select the sketch to which you want to apply the dimensional constraints. In our case, we select a circle, as shown in Figure 2. Click the mouse pointer on the sketch where you want to apply the constraint, as shown in Figure 2.

Now, if you drag the circle, you observe that you are unable to change the dimension of the circle, but only the position of the circle in the Sketcher workbench. In the next section, we apply the contact constraint to a sketch. Applying a Contact ConstraintThe contact constraint is applied to modify the existing sketches in such a manner that they exhibit certain properties such as tangency, concentricity, and coincidence.

For example, the contact constraint can be applied on two or more sketches to make them coincident, concentric, or tangent to each other. Perform the following steps to apply a contact constraint to a circle to make it concentric to an ellipse: Select the circle to which you want to apply the contact constraint Figure 2. Similarly, you can also create coincidence and tangency in sketches.

Applying a Fix Together ConstraintThe x together constraint attaches one sketch with another. The two sketches are xed to each other such that they move together to any area in the Sketcher workbench. Perform the following steps to apply the x together constraint to a sketch: Select two circles to which you want to apply the x together constraint, as shown in Figure 2. Now, if you drag any of the circles, both circles will move together, as shown in Figure 2.

This implies that the circles are not attached visibly but by behavior. After learning to apply the x together constraint, we next learn how to apply auto constraints on the sketch. Applying the Auto ConstraintAll the possible constraints applicable on a particular sketch are applied after invoking the auto constraint. This is different from the rest of the constraints, where we need to apply each constraint individually, such as radius, length, and dimension.

In the Sketcher workbench, auto constraint is the option that when applied to any object will set all the possible constraints according to that object instead of applying each constraint separately. Perform the following steps to apply an auto constraint to a sketch: Select the sketch to which you want to apply the auto constraints.

In our case, we have selected a line on which we need to apply auto constraints, as shown in Figure 2. Select the sketch on which the auto constraint will be added. The selected sketch is added to the dialog box.

In our case, we have selected the element to be constrained and 1 Line appears in the dialog box Figure 2. Now, this line cannot be further modied. Apart from applying individual constraints, you can also apply and remove multiple constraints. In other words, you can either apply or remove constraints to a particular sketch from the Sketcher workbench.

Perform the following steps to apply multiple constraints to a sketch: Select the line to which you want to apply multiple constraints Figure 2. The dialog box consists of a list of geometrical and dimensional constraints that are applied to a line along with the following constraints: Applies the length constraints for the selected sketches Fix: Fixes the location of the constraints, such as x the position of a line Horizontal: Fixes the horizontal constraint on the sketch 3.

Select the Length and Horizontal check boxes to apply the length and horizontal constraints, respectively Figure 2. Apart from applying constraints, you can also remove a constraint using the Constraint Denition dialog box. This can be done by clearing the check box associated with the constraint, in the Constraint Denition dialog box. For example, if the check box containing the length constraint is cleared, then the length constraint is removed, as shown in Figure 2.

Now, the discussion on constraints ends. We have learned to add various constraints to the sketches apart from drawing and editing these sketches. With this, you have reached the end of this chapter. We summarize all the topics covered in this chapter. Apart from creating solid models, the Part Design workbench is also used for advanced modeling of solid models, such as creating a hole, pocket, llet, and adding rectangular as well as circular patterns.

Moreover, the Part Design workbench is also used to modify the structure of a solid model by inserting an additional body into a solid model. The Part Design workbench contains several options for advanced modeling of the solid models.

For example, the sketch-based features are used to create solid models of the sketches that are drawn in the Sketcher workbench. Similarly, the dress-up features are used to modify the solid models created in the Part Design workbench. In addition, the transformation features are used to modify the solid models by transforming them along a direction, plane, or by symmetry.

In this chapter, we learn to create the solid models by using the sketch-based, dress-up, and transformation features of the Part Design workbench. We also discuss the addition of a body into a solid model. It is required to rst draw the sketches in the Sketcher workbench and then create the solid model of these sketches in the Part Design workbench. Apart from creating solid models, you can also modify the solid models in various ways by creating holes, pockets, and shafts using sketch-based features.

In this section, we learn to use the following types of sketch-based features with solid models: The pad feature The shaft feature The pocket feature The hole feature The rib feature We start by discussing the use of the pad feature to create a solid model.

The Pad FeatureThe pad feature of the Part Design workbench is a feature that is commonly used to create a pad. A pad is created to add a solid base to a primary sketch that is drawn in the Sketcher workbench.

In other words, you can use the pad feature to draw the solid models for sketches, such as a rectangle, parallelogram, or circle. The default grid setting of the Sketcher workbench has been modied by changing the value of graduation settings as 20 mm. You can refer to Chapter 2 for procedures to change the graduation setting. Perform the following steps to create a pad in the Part Design workbench: Specify the starting point at coordinate 55, 45 , which serves as the center of the hexagon Figure 3.

Drag and click at this point to coordinate , 45 , as shown in Figure 3. Chapter 3Part Design Workbench4. Click the Exit workbench button in the toolbar of the Sketcher workbench, as shown in Figure 3. Specify the length of the solid model. In our case, we have specied the length as 30 mm Figure 3. We next learn how to use the shaft feature to create a revolved model.

The Shaft FeatureThe shaft feature of the Part Design workbench is used to create a revolving solid model. The sketch drawn in the Sketcher workbench is revolved around a specic axis at a specied angle. You can nd the correct estimation of the orientation and revolution of a particular sketch while creating a revolved solid model.

This data can be used for further improvement of the solid model. Perform the following steps to create a shaft: Create a sketch in the Sketcher workbench. In our case, we have created a semicircle Figure 3.

Specify the angle of rotation for the sketch. In our case, the rst angle is set to degrees in the Shaft Denition dialog box Figure 3. In our case, we select Sketch. Select the axis in the Axis option along which the image will be rotated Figure 3.

We next learn to use a pocket feature to remove a part from the solid model. The Pocket FeatureThe pocket feature of the Part Design workbench creates a pocket in the solid model by removing a selected portion from a solid model.

The utility of the pocket feature is to form the resulting solid image by extruding different surfaces from a solid model. In other words, the utility of the pocket feature is the creation of a precise cut in the solid model to make a design or pattern with a cavity.

Perform the following steps to create a pocket: Create a shape in the Sketcher workbench. In our case, we create a parallelogram Figure 3. The Pad Denition dialog box appears Figure 3. The solid model after adding the pad feature is shown in Figure 3. Open this solid model Figure 3. A new image will pop up, as shown in Figure 3. Modify the sketch shown in Figure 3. The nal sketch is shown in Figure 3. Open the sketch Figure 3. It shows the default values for the pocket feature and preview in Figure 3.

Set the Type option as Up to last limit to create a solid model by pushing out a xed cross section of the hexagon or extruding it completely through the initial solid model Figure 3.

The Pocket Denition dialog box consists of First Limit sections that specify the several extensions of a pocket in the solid model, such as Up to next, Up to last, Up to plane. The Up to last option species that the pocket would completely extrude through the initial solid model.

In other words, the extruding Up to last option would push out the complete surface of the solid model. Select the sketch that would be added as a pocket of the solid model. In our case it is Sketch. The main utility of the pocket feature is to form a solid model by extruding different shapes, such as a circle, spline, ellipse, or rectangle. After discussing the pocket feature, we next learn how to use the hole feature to create a hole in a solid model.

The Hole FeatureThe hole feature of the Part Design workbench is used to create a hole in a solid model. You create a hole in a solid model to join two solid models. Perform the following steps to create a hole in a solid model: Create a cylindrical elongated hole in the Sketcher workbench Figure 3. Create the solid model of the sketch by using the pad feature Figure 3.

The nal model of the solid is shown in Figure 3. It reects the default values for the hole feature, as shown in Figure 3. The Up To Last option species that the hole would be added up to the last face of a solid model. In other words, the extruding Up To Last option would create a hole through the complete depth of the solid originating from the part of solid model that is selected. Select the default settings in the Type tab that is Simple, as a simple hole is being created Figure 3.

The Simple option is selected as the default hole. Apart from selecting the default setting, you can also draw some other types of hole, such as Tapered, Counterbored , Countersunk , and Counterdrilled by selecting different options from the drop-down list under the Type tab in the Hole Denition dialog box.

Click the OK button, as shown in Figure 3. The pocket feature is different from a hole in the shape, as the shapes formed by the result of the two operations are different.

A hole is circular in shape, whereas a pocket can be formed in any shape. After discussing the hole feature, we next learn how to use the rib feature for advanced modeling of solid models. The curve and the prole are drawn in the Sketcher workbench and the rib feature is added in the Part Design workbench.

In addition, the curve also acts as a reference along which the element prole is bent. Perform the following steps to create a rib: Create a curve on which the rib would be formed in the Sketcher workbench.

In our case, we create a spline Figure 3. Exit from the Part Design workbench by using the Sketch button of the Sketcher toolbar and open the curve Figure 3. Draw a prole in the Sketcher workbench on which the rib feature is added. In our case, a parallelogram is sketched on the spline Figure 3. Select the Exit workbench button from the Sketcher workbench, as shown in Figure 3.

Select the prole curve to create a rib Figure 3. The preview of the rib is displayed in Figure 3. All the sketches cannot be added in the Sketcher workbench at an instance; therefore, to add the new part in a different plane, we need to rst exit from the Sketcher workbench and reopen it in another plane.

The following are the basic requirements that form the basis for transition between the Sketcher and Part Design workbenches: When the requirement is to create a solid model of the sketch in the Part Design workbench using the pad feature and then add the additional sketch to the solid model, we need to switch from the Part Design workbench to the Sketcher workbench and add the additional features.

An example is adding a pocket. When the requirement is to create a sketch in the Sketcher workbench and modify it by adding a new sketch, we need to exit from the Sketcher workbench to the Part Design workbench and reopen the sketch in the Sketcher workbench.

An example is creating a ribbed curve. We next learn how to add the dress-up feature to the existing sketches in the Part Design workbench. While adding the dress-up features, you do not need to modify the initial sketch by drawing any additional sketches. You can directly apply the dress-up features on the solid model.

In this section, we create solid models and add the following types of dress-up features: The llet feature The chamfer feature The draft feature The shell feature We start the discussion with the use of the llet feature. The Fillet FeatureThe llet feature is used to create a rounded corner at the intersection of two surfaces. In addition, if a surface is selected, then all the edges corresponding to that surface are lleted.

The edge llet feature The variable radius llet feature The faceface llet feature The tritangent llet feature The Edge Fillet Feature The edge llet feature is used to llet or round the sharpened edges of a solid model.

Perform the following steps to add an edge llet and create the edge-lleted solid model: In our case, we create a hexagon Figure 3. Create a solid model of the sketch by using the pad feature. The solid model created is shown in Figure 3. Select the edges that you want to llet. The number of selected edges would be shown in the Object s to llet box in the Edge Fillet Denition dialog box Figure 3. We next discuss the addition of a variable radius llet to a solid model.

The Variable Radius Fillet Feature The variable radius llet feature is used to apply llets of varied radius to the different edges of the solid models. Perform the following steps to create a variable radius lleted solid model: Create a solid model from the sketch of a parallelogram by using the pad feature, as shown in Figure 3.

Select the edge you want to llet. The number of selected edges is shown in the Edge s to llet box Figure 3. Set the radius of the llet by entering the appropriate value in the Radius option. In our case, we set the radius of the llet applied on Edge2 to 5 mm, as shown in Figure 3. Repeat steps 3 and 4 to set the radius of the other edges. In our case, we have entered the radius of the second edge as 15 mm Figure 3.

The nal solid model is shown in Figure 3. To apply the faceface llet, rst the faces of the solid model are selected and then the faceface llet feature is applied. Perform the following steps to create a faceface lleted solid model: Create a sketch consisting of two concentric circles in the Sketcher workbench Figure 3. Create a solid model by using the pad feature in the Part Design workbench, as shown in Figure 3.

Select the faces that you want to llet. In our case, the outer and inner faces are selected on which the faceface llet feature would be applied. The Tritangent Fillet Feature You apply the tritangent feature by rst selecting the two supporting faces and then selecting the face that would be removed to create the desired solid model. The lleted part of the sketch is tangent to the selected surfaces. Perform the following steps to add a tritangent llet feature to the selected part of a solid: Create a solid model of the sketch by using the pad feature in the Part Design workbench.

In our case, the solid model created by using the pad feature is from the design of a parallelogram, as shown in Figure 3. Select the rst face of the solid model to llet, as shown in Figure 3. After rotation the opposite face of the solid model is visible, as shown in Figure 3. Select the second face opposite to the previously selected face to llet, as shown in Figure 3. Select that face of the solid model that will be lleted Figure 3.

In our case, Pad. The Chamfer FeatureThe chamfer feature is used to add a bevel face to the edge of a solid model. The chamfer feature is applied to any edge of a solid model. However, in the case of chamfering adjacent faces of a solid model, the angle of the surface should always be less than 90 degrees.

Perform the following steps to create a chamfered solid model:The Fillet FeatureThe llet feature is used to create a rounded corner at the intersection of two surfaces. In our case, we have clicked the xy-plane, as shown in Figure 2. Once you have created a guide curve and the prole, you can create a swept surface.

Enter the distance by which the solid model would be translated. You can also specify the x-axis or the y-axis as the direction for the cylindrical surface by right-clicking inside the Direction box in the Cylinder Surface Denition dialog box and selecting the X Component and Y Component options, respectively, from the context menu.

Select the pocket, which is added as a pattern in the solid model. Select the line that you want to rotate, as shown in Figure 2. Set options, such as Limit 1 and Limit 2 dimensions, for the extrusion wall to be created in the Extrusion Denition dialog box Figure 6. Select the option from the Parameters drop-down list. You can later create a bend at the intersection of the base wall and the extrusion wall.